A new approach to solving homelessness in Sioux City and Siouxland


By matt@siouxlandscanner.com Updated on Monday, November 04 2019 10:11pm

STOP giving money to people at intersections asking for it. You are not helping the homeless population at all. Did you know that a lot of these people aren't homeless? This is what they do to make money! Some of them more than people working actual jobs 40+ hours a week. Did you know that many times money you may give goes to support drug and alcohol addictions? If you want to give, give to one of the many local organizations that provide food, clothing, shelter, and healthcare to the homeless and needy.

For those that disagree with me or think I'm heartless. Let me tell you about an idea I have, that will help the needy and homeless. It will also bring actual affordable housing to Sioux City. We have many unusable lots in the city. Many are too small or in neighborhoods, people will not spend money to build in. Our city code requires new homes to be more than 600 and some odd square. This must be changed!





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Once we get the size requirement fixed. We then build actual smaller homes. We can use the proceeds from the ones people that can afford to buy them to build the ones for those who can't. This not only helps people in need, but it also helps to rebuild neighborhoods and fill in empty lots. There are many hurdles, including money. We will never be able to fix homelessness but we can do things for those that want help and want to change their lives. We can help those that want a safe place to live that doesn't cost 50k, 100k, 200k.

City Council, you're up first. Let's pass a local law that removes the size requirements for lots and home sizes for low-income housing. In that, property tax on all such low-income housing should have a least a 10-year tax abatement!

I have a lot more ideas. I'm not talking about dropping 50 tiny homes on big unused lots. I'm talking about filling in our neighborhoods with smaller, affordable homes and getting people into homes and off the streets.